Wednesday, April 26, 2017

BLOG TOUR - CHLOE SNOW'S DIARY: CONFESSIONS OF A HIGH SCHOOL DISASTER by Emma Chastain

Hi Everyone, I'm so excited to be part of this blog tour for Chloe Snow's Diary: Confessions of a High School Disaster! This is an amazing book and you should read it if you love Geek Girl, Waiting for Callback or if your older a Bridget Jones's Diary for Teens. I posted my review of this book yesterday so click here if you want to take a look. Before I continue with my blog tour piece, here is a little bit more on the book...




Fourteen-year-old Chloe Snow is about to start ninth grade when her mum announces she can’t create art in suburban Massachusetts, and goes to Mexico to work on her novel. As she is left with only her (socially awkward) dad as company, Chloe faces multiple new challenges as she begins high school.

Told in hilarious, heart-warming and awkwardly honest diary entries, this is Bridget Jones’s Diary for a new generation. and is set to make you laugh, cringe, and possibly cry throughout!


How to Write a Novel in 6 Easy Steps
Emma Chastain

I’ve wanted to write a book since I was in first grade, but for three and a half decades, I didn’t. Below, I’ve listed the six things that helped me finally get off my butt and do it. I’m an internet-addicted lazybones, and the tactics I used might not be relevant for more organized, motivated writers, but if you’ve ever found yourself watching videos of otters holding hands when you’re supposed to be working, one or more items on the below list might be useful. I hope so!

1. Write the book you want to read yourself.
Every writing teacher tells you this, but it took me a long time to grasp the profound wisdom of the advice. For a long time, I felt I should write a searing, slightly dour work of literary fiction. Finally it dawned on me that the books I love, the books I read and reread, are comic epistolary novels narrated by well-meaning but completely clueless characters (to name just a few: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes; Diary of a Nobody; I Capture the Castle; Angus, Thongs, and Full-Frontal Snogging; Bridget Jones’s Diary), and that I wanted to write something that would fit on a shelf with these books.

2. Outline. Have you started umpteen novels, only to abandon them 1,000 or 10,000 words in because you have no idea where you’re going or what the story is? Me too! Plenty of writers can feel their way along, seeing only as far as their headlights, but I can’t. I need Waze.

3. Write a little bit every day. My goal is to write for 20 minutes a day. Twenty minutes is nothing, obviously—I could spend that long editing a tweet, or tweezing a single eyebrow. But I make the goal tiny on purpose, so that I’ll feel embarrassed if I can’t pull it off. Sometimes I write for 20 minutes, sometimes I write for two hours, but I never write for long. I think most people (including me) underestimate how much work they can get done in small increments. The every-dayness is important, too. If I stay away from my manuscript for longer than a day, I start to lose my intimate knowledge of it, and my interest in it.

4. While you’re writing, write. When I have my Word doc open, I don’t let myself open tabs, eat, listen to music, or even stand up. If I need to Google something, I make a note so I’ll remember to do it later. When I get a little stuck and feel the familiar urge to escape by looking at my phone, I don’t let myself. I force myself to be uncomfortable and work out whatever small problem I’m facing. Maybe you have better self-control than I do, and can glance at Twitter for a minute and then get back to your manuscript. I have zero self-control, so I have to abstain completely.

5. Leave yourself instructions. When I’m done writing, I jot down a quick note about where to start the next day (“keep figuring out Halloween dance,” “fix fight scene on p. 132”). You think you’ll remember where you were and what you were doing, but you won’t.

6. Give up things you enjoy. If you have kids or a job or school commitments and you want to write a book, you’re probably going to have to stop doing stuff you like to do or feel you should do. I don’t watch TV or movies anymore, and I don’t exercise. And I hate it! I desperately want to binge “Big Little Lies,” and I desperately want to feel like I’m a human being with muscles and not a quivering mass of Jell-O wearing yoga pants. But writing is more important to me than doing that stuff, so for now, I’m a gelatinous non-human who has not seen Nicole Kidman breaking down in her therapist’s office (does she break down, or is she icily composed? I have no idea!).


Emma Chastain

About Emma
Emma Chastain is a graduate of Barnard College, Columbia University, and the Creative Writing Program at Boston University. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and children.



My #DailyConfession is this book is ingeniously funny and every teen girl should read it! - Check out my review here and be sure to check out the rest of the tour this week.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

REVIEW - CHLOE SNOW'S DIARY: CONFESSIONS OF A HIGH SCHOOL DISASTER by Emma Chastain

Chloe Snow's Diary: Confessions of a High School Disaster
by Emma Chastain
Publisher - Simon & Schuster
Release Date - April 20th 2017
Buy - Amazon | Book Depository

Fourteen-year-old Chloe Snow is about to start ninth grade when her mum announces she can’t create art in suburban Massachusetts, and goes to Mexico to work on her novel. As she is left with only her (socially awkward) dad as company, Chloe faces multiple new challenges as she begins high school.

Told in hilarious, heart-warming and awkwardly honest diary entries, this is Bridget Jones’s Diary for a new generation. and is set to make you laugh, cringe, and possibly cry throughout!




My Review

Would you believe me if I told you I've never read Bridget's Jones's Diary - I've only watched them. Would you believe me when I say I don't really read diaries in fiction much - that aside I feel Chloe Snow has certainly changed my tune on this - I LOVED IT! 

Chloe Snow's story was told through an entry in her diary every day - it all begins just before freshman year of high school, Chloe Snow has high hopes, new year new school, she has expectations to live up too one of which to have her first kiss, - I mean every one else has and already on second base so she feels she needs to have it by New Year's Eve. Along the way she meets the heartfelt Tristan, her best friend and not so nice people as well. Her freshman year takes her on a journey of self discovery, facing new challenges and also exceeding her own expectations but at the end of the day it's being herself that trumps all. 

Chloe Snow reminds me a bit of me - I think we all have those thoughts about boys, friendships, school life at that age. Chloe isn't a stranger to making bad decisions, and she messes up a lot which you will get annoyed at, but its her quirks and redeeming qualities that make her who she is. What I loved was that aside from the funny, the cringe and the constant smile you display on your face when your reading it is that it focused lightly on the serious of your teenage years too. I learned something too: Did you know you should say Rabbit Rabbit at the beginning of the month, for good luck all month and it derived from Britain? Nope I didn't. 

This is the perfect book if you loved Waiting for Callback series by Perdita and Honor Cargill and also Flirty Dancing series by Jenny McLanan.  I hope we see Chloe Snow a lot more - I'd love to go through her sophomore and senior years and see what other trouble and cringe worthy moments she gets up too. My #DailyConfession is this book is ingeniously funny and every teen girl should read it!

Rating - 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

REVIEW - A QUIET KIND OF THUNDER by Sara Barnard

A Quiet Kind of Thunder
by Sara Barnard
Publisher - Macmillan Children's Books
Release Date - January 12th 2017
Buy - Amazon | Book Depository

Steffi doesn't talk, but she has so much to say. Rhys can't hear, but he can listen.Their love isn't a lightning strike, it's the rumbling roll of thunder.

Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life - she's been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He's deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language means that she's assigned to look after him. To Rhys, it doesn't matter that Steffi doesn't talk, and as they find ways to communicate, Steffi finds that she does have a voice, and that she's falling in love with the one person who makes her feel brave enough to use it. 

From the bestselling author of Beautiful Broken Things comes a love story about the times when a whisper is as good as a shout.

My Review

First, let's appreciate and look at this cover. I mean it doesn't do any justice on a computer screen when you look and feel it in your hands, that it's embossed and everything and not just on the outside either, the beauty continues to the inside and every page after that until the end. THIS BOOK people, THIS book, this is what it's all about right now, especially when you meet Rhys and Steffi! You will just melt and be completely mesmerised by their relationship.

Steffi is a selective mute, or as shes says it "I'm a natural introvert with severe social anxiety and a shyness that is basically pathalogical." But when she was little, her shyness manifested into her mutism, you can only really know it though only if she's at school with people she's not familiar with, or strangers on the street, that's where the selectiveness comes in. As she enters 6th Form without her best friend Tem, she is approached by the head and introduced to a boy named Rhys. He's deaf and the only communication they know and use is BSL, British Sign Language and this is where their story begins...

Steffi and Rhys just clicked, maybe it started with their shared BSL communication, maybe that was the way to open a lock between both of their hearts, but I think as they got to know each other more, they found themselves becoming stronger individually, they did depend on each other for that strength but it also gave them the inspiration to try new things and to go outside of their comfort zone. What I loved about them was that they aren't so different from everyone else. We treat them that way, we label them that way, there BSL separates them from people, they distant themselves instantly from the real world. But what's really inspiring is in BSL itself, it's a language, just like french and Spanish, you learn it, you say it, you develop into something beautiful. Steffi and Rhys might stand out from others because they might have something less, but what they do still have is a voice to be heard and seen. All they need is a little guidance and encouragement so they can do just about anything and that's their relationship, finding a life's path and finding each other.

Steffi and Rhys is a set of characters that is unlike anything I've ever read in a long time. Their relationship begins the moment they sign hello to each other. It's a communication that isn't explored enough or the fact that it's only really used to a selective group of people. I know a bit of sign language, my mum works with special needs and has loads of books on it. I used to read them and practice myself. Using your hands to convey and interpret your life, your meaning is such a touching and almost awe-like expression to have between two people or a group. But putting such a unique communication style into a romance, contemporary novel like this, is just simply beautiful especially with two persona's as Steffi and Rhys.

Meeting Miss Barnard 2 times this year in different events, I really got the sense for her book event after reading it. I saw the research, her inspiration for this novel come through like a lightening strike. I read Beautiful Broken Things when it first came out and I really enjoyed it, but for me, this is Sara's best book to date. Read it please. It's as beautiful on the outside as it is in...

Rating - 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟