Monday, June 05, 2017

BLOG TOUR: GUEST POST - TENDER EARTH by Sita Brahmachari

Hi Everyone, it's been a while again. I've just come back from a lovely week's holiday, so getting back into the swing of things, including back at work today. 

So to start off being back at home and getting back into blogging, I have a guest post as part of Sita's latest novel Tender Earth. They all have calls to action and links out to themed things to do (instead of feeling powerless) - and all link to Amnesty too (they endorsed the book). My themed topic is Women's March and Issues. Before you read the guest post, here is a little more about Tender Earth.



Tender Earth
by Sita Brahmachari
Publisher - Macmillan Children's Books
Release Date - June 1st 2017
Buy - Amazon | Book Depository

Laila Levenson has always been the baby of the family, but now with her older siblings, Mira and Krish, leaving home just as she starts secondary school, everything feels like it's changing... can the reappearance of Nana Josie's Protest Book and the spirit it releases in Laila, her friends and her local community, help her find her own voice and discover what she truly believes in?

A powerful chime rings through Laila's mind, guiding her to walk the footsteps of the past on her way to discover her own future.



Tender Earth by Sita Brahmachari
‘A coming of age story for young protesters everywhere.’
Tender Earth is endorsed by Amnesty International UK because ‘it illuminates the importance of equality, friendship and solidarity, and upholds our right to protest against injustice.'

Here are some banners held up in Tender Earth:

GIRLS JUST WANT TO HAVE FUN-
DAMENTAL HUMAN RIGHTS

I AM A MUSLIM WOMAN
I AM THIRTEEN YEARS OLD
MALALA WAS TWELVE WHEN SHE CHANGED THE WORLD
HOW OLD WILL YOU BE?

MEN OF QUALITY DON’T FEAR EQUALITY
TOO OLD TO MARCH
NOT TOO OLD TO PROTEST

MY BODY IS MY BORDER. HANDS OFF
HERE FOR MY TRANS SISTERS


Tender Earth celebrates the power of young women to stand up against injustice. As I write I think about all the young women and men and their families who have been attacked recently in Manchester. Those whose lives were cut short because of hate. I have written this poem in their honour, and it links to some of the things that Laila Levenson and her friends have to face in Tender Earth. Like many of my fellow authors I hope my stories will have a positive impact on young readers:

Let not this fill your hearts with hate
Let not this stop you dancing, singing, playing
This earth on which you lay your flowers of loss
is bruised and tender
The willow weeps
But still it grows in splendour
Underneath these concrete paths
Rivers flow
Entwined our branches far and wide
Drawing water from deep courses
All flowing to a human sea
Make it not poisoned
Drink from the earth with love not hate
Let not this stop you dancing, singing, laughing, playing
Protest, stand up, speak out!
Sit together in candle light
Find comfort in each other


Tender Earth is told through the eyes of Laila Levenson. She and her friends are searching to find themselves a place and voice in the world. Laila is becoming conscious of the inequalities that exist between men and women. Like the rest of us, she has heard the kind of things that world leaders have said about the rights of women and during the course of the novel she is becoming conscious that the right of girls to be educated, to be in control of their own bodies, their legal rights, their right to express themselves, are all far from equal.

When Laila learns that the first march her Nana Josie ever went on was a Women’s March, it sparks her imagination, and there are plenty of things that happen to Laila and her friends in Tender Earth that make her understand why her Nana will never forget her Women’s March.

Mrs Latif, Laila’s inspirational teacher gives her I am Malala to read. This is what Laila writes in her reading record at school after she has read it:

I’m sitting in my uniform at my desk, filling in my reading record.

Themes: A girl can change an unfair world. Adults should listen to children. Adults should protect children. All children should have access to education. Children can see what bad things adults do. Children can change the world.

Comments: This is the best book I have ever read. One day I would like to meet Malala Yousafzai.

My favourite quotes:

“One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.”
“When the whole world is silent, even one voice becomes powerful.”

There are many powerful women characters in Laila’s past and present who guide her to become the person we see her growing into in Tender Earth.

Take a look at these links that I explored in my research… convert thought into action and, as soon as you are legally able to, VOTE for what you believe in.


This video clip from #BlackLivesMatter seems to speak to something at the core of Tender Earth where one generation of empathetic women seeks to hand over the baton to another.

https://twitter.com/womensmarch/status/831931108250046477/video/1
https://debatemate.com/
http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/reports/why-women-march-467043

Look up @womensmarch on Twitter

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/mar/29/fifth-wave-feminists-young-activists

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/may/20/parliament-thought-cleaner-young-activists-changing-british-politics


Image result for sita brahmachari
About Sita
Sita was born in Derby in 1966, to an Indian doctor from Kolkata and an English nurse from the Lake District. She has a BA in English Literature and an MA in Arts Education. Her many projects and writing commissions have been produced in theatres, universities, schools and community groups throughout Britain and America. ARTICHOKE HEARTS is her first novel for young people. Sita lives and works in North London with her husband, three children and a temperamental cat.



This is quite a powerful guest post and I'm honoured to be part of the tour to share it. I can't wait to read this book too. Please go a head a take a look at this one, and make sure to follow the tour around too. 


6 comments:

  1. This looks really interesting! Thanks so much for sharing it!

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    1. It does and I can't wait to read it. Thanks for stopping by!

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  2. Replies
    1. I know I think this book will have quite an impact on the reading community. Cant wait to read it myself. Thanks for stopping by Christy.

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  3. This is a really incredible and well-written guest post, so thanks for sharing, Emma! I definitely need to check out this novel.

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    Replies
    1. It been so great to have her on the blog - this post makes me want to read it even more.

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