Monday, 19 February 2018

#FANTASTICALFEB with Taran Martharu (author of The Summoner Series)

Hi Everyone, As you may all know I'm having a fantasy month on the blog, so as well as reading fantasy books, I'm also featuring some of my favourites as well as discovering some new authors too. So next guest author on my blog is Taran Matharu, author of The Summoner trilogy. So before I hand over to Taran talking about how to design a fantasy creature, here is a little bit more about the series. 


About the Summoner Trilogy
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From The Novice:
Enter an immersive fantasy world where one boy’s ability to summon demons will change the fate of an empire…

Fletcher was nothing more than a humble blacksmith’s apprentice, when a chance encounter leads to the discovery that he has the ability to summon demons from another world. Chased from his village for a crime he did not commit, he must travel with his demon to the Vocans Academy, where the gifted are trained in the art of summoning. The academy will put Fletcher through a gauntlet of gruelling lessons, training him as a battlemage to fight in the Hominum Empire’s war against the savage orcs.

Rubbing shoulders with the children of the most powerful nobles in the land, Fletcher must tread carefully. The power hungry Forsyth twins lurk in the shadows, plotting to further their family’s interests. Then there is Sylva, an elf who will do anything she can to forge an alliance between her people and Hominum, even if it means betraying her friends. Othello is the first ever dwarf at the academy, and his people have long been oppressed by Hominum’s rulers, which provokes tension amongst those he studies alongside. Fletcher will find himself caught in the middle of powerful forces, with nothing but his demon Ignatius to help him. As the pieces on the board manoeuvre for supremacy, Fletcher must decide where his loyalties lie. The fate of an empire is in his hands...
Taran's first book in the Summoner Trilogy, The Novice is one of 5 YA books for World Book Day - only £2.50!!! Look out for it all good booksellers around March 1st!


Designing Fantasy Worlds – By Taran Matharu
Writing in a fantasy world is no easy task. World building is tricky – too much, too soon and you're 'info dumping'. Too little, too late and the reader will have very little idea of what the world is like.

But that's not what I'm here to talk about. Instead, I want to talk about designing the world in the first place, before you write the story. In fantasy, the world is often the first thing readers look at when deciding if it's a book they would like to read, so it's important to make it a good one.

Five stages of creating a new world:

Step 1: The Premise

After the first exercise, you will know what the basic premise of your world is. Maybe you want to write about dragon riders vs. necromancers, for example. So drill down into these things first. Is there a military element to the dragon riders and if so, what's it like? How many types of dragon are there? Are necromancers born with the ability, or is it taught?

Exercises: Describe your world in one or two sentences, then write down four elements that explore the basic premise of the world you are designing.

Step 2: The Wider World

Once you have the main stage set, ask yourself, how does this affect the day to day of the wider world? Are there dragon transports, carrying goods back and forth? Do people no longer fear death, knowing they can return as the undead? Is this a medieval fantasy, or are there gunpowder weapons powerful enough to take down a dragon? These are the things you need to explore before you begin writing. It will add detail and colour to the world you build, and the story will be all the richer for it.

Exercise: Write down four ways your premise impacts on the wider world.

Step 3: The People

Quite simply, a world is only as good as the people in it. It is somewhat an extension of Step 2, with more focus on the different groups of people who populate the world. Their history and motivations can even add a political element. Are undead slaves doing all the work? Perhaps there are activists, campaigning for undead rights. What are dragon riders like? Do other troops support them, or do they fight alone? Are there royal and noble families? Again, these questions will not only allow you to build a more coherent world, but also allow you to develop the characters that will feature in your book.

Exercise: Write down four groups of people in your world.

Step 4: The Geography

The fantasy map is always fun to design. But it also serves as an important backdrop for your world. Is it a tropical paradise, full of mountains for dragons to roost in? Or is it a flat wasteland, perfect for roving hordes of zombies.

The landscape the world takes place in is important. Although great swathes of purple prose describing the landscape can be irritating. Find the right balance and your work takes on a cinematic quality. Laying this all out early will help you when developing your world and the plot itself. Do the distances involved have an impact? Are some places impassable, requiring the hero to take a certain route? Think about how important geography is in The Lord of the Rings.

Again, Step 2 comes into play here. With zombies everywhere, you might have enormous walled cities, the last bastions for humanity's survival. Or maybe it is the dragons that are the real threat, scaring people into living in underground cities.

Exercise: Write down four ways geography impacts your world.

Step 5: Choosing What Belongs and What Doesn't.

Be ambitious, but realistic. At the same time, try to stay flexible.

If you're anything like me, you'll have more ideas than you can count. Keep them all in the back of your mind as you write, but always be aware of one thing:

Sometimes, a world can be too complex and creative. You'll find yourself bogged down in lengthy explanations, or exploring some aspect of the world's intricacies that throws the plot off course. Be wary of your book becoming an encyclopaedic exploration of a world, rather than a story.

Finally, don't be afraid to adapt as you write. Maybe some aspect of the world doesn't fit, or you can't do it justice in the text you can spare to feature it in. Perhaps it has no relevance to the story, serving as a distraction rather than a backdrop. When writing, it's important to keep to the core of the world first and filter in the rest when it feels natural. Your writer instincts might warn you that something isn't quite working. Listen to them if they do.



Taran Matharu
About Taran Matharu

Taran Matharu is a New York Times bestselling author. He was born in London in 1990 and found a passion for reading at a very early age. His love for stories developed into a desire to create his own during early adolescence, beginning his first book at 9 years old.
Straight after graduating with a First Class degree in Business Administration, Taran was keen to explore a new avenue and get inside the publishing world, landing an internship in Digital Sales at Penguin Random House, from June to September 2013.
Thereafter, while taking time off to travel, Taran began to write ‘Summoner’ in November 2013 at the age of 22, taking part in ‘Nanowrimo 2013’.
Thanks to Wattpad.com and updating daily, its popularity dramatically increased, reaching over 3 million reads in less than six months. After being featured by NBC News, Taran decided to launch his professional writing career and has never looked back.

Thank you so much to Team BKMRK and Taran for being part of my #FantasticalFeb! Don't forget to bag WBD The Novice for only £2.50!

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